The Bikeways Master Plan seeks to implement various strategies to accommodate bikes on the road. These include sharrows, bicycle boulevards, dedicated bike lanes and street signage. Information is provided on each of these below to help bicyclists, motorists and pedestrians understand what each of these are.

Sharrows

ImageShared lane pavement markings (or “sharrows”) are bicycle symbols carefully placed to guide bicyclists to the best place to ride to avoid doors opening from parked cars; and sharrows are also placed to remind drivers to share the road with cyclists.

Unlike bicycle lanes, sharrows do not designate a particular part of the street for the exclusive use of bicyclists.

They are simply a marking to guide bicyclists to the best place to ride and help motorists expect to see and share the lane with bicyclists.

Bicycle Boulevard

ImageA Bicycle Boulevard is a street with low traffic volume and low speeds that generally parallel major streets.

These are designated as being safer for bicyclists.

A variety of signage and on-street markings are used to guide the bicyclist along the route.

Dedicated Bike Lane

ImageA dedicated bike lane is a lane striped and marked for use specifically by bicyclists. They are generally found on roads with heavier traffic volumes and with a proper width to accommodate the extra lane.

Rapid Rectangular Flashing Beacon (RRFB)

imageRRFBs are user-actuated amber LEDs that supplement warning signs at unsignalized intersections or mid-block crosswalks.

They can be activated by pedestrians manually by a push button or passively by a pedestrian detection system.

RRFBs use an irregular flash pattern that is similar to emergency flashers on police vehicles.

Back-in Parking

ImageThe use of back-in/head-out angle parking has increased steadily in cities across the country for safety reasons. Back-in spots improve sight lines when cars exit a stall, making it easier to spot approaching vehicles or bicyclists.

Loading items into a trunk or tailgate is easier and safer to do from the sidewalk than the street.

© City of Topeka